Moving to online teaching creates copyright issues

Online teaching creates new obstacles for faculty when navigating copyright restrictions. The main copyright issue when moving a face-to-face course online is that you no longer can rely on an exception in the Copyright Act that allows you to display and perform material without permission or license in face-to-face classrooms. That means if you want to upload a digital version of the same material, you will need to either fit it into another exception (fair use or TEACH act) or get a license for the material. As the university’s copyright officer, I can help you work through this analysis and

Library grants are available for faculty needs

University Libraries offer three grant programs to help Texas State faculty purchase library materials need to support research.

The deadline for the spring 2020 Online Resources Grants is 5 p.m. Friday, February 14. These grants can be used to purchase larger one-time online resources that one department cannot afford through the standard library allocation. A total of $180,000 is available for these grants during the 2019-20 academic year. These funds are often used to purchase primary source databases, journal backfile collections, e-book collections and audio or streaming media collections. Some ideas for use of these funds are found on our One-Time Resources web page. Priority will be given to proposals for resources that enhance the library’s collection and that benefit many departments or greatly benefit one area.

Library research grants helps faculty pay for research and creative activity resources through the acquisition of library materials. Applications for this grant program are due in early November. Eligible materials include things like back issues of journals, electronic resources, DVDs, CDs and microform. Priority is given to materials that can be permanently added to the library collection.

New tenure-track faculty can apply for up to $1,000 in New Faculty Start-Up Grants needed to enhance the library’s collections. These applications are reviewed and funded between September and June. During the 2019-20 academic year, $15,000 was available for funding.

Questions about online resources grants and library research grants should be directed to Head Acquisitions Librarian Ginger Williams at vkw11@txstate.edu. New Faculty Startup Grant questions should be directed to Monographic Acquisitions Librarian Amanda Price at anp125@txstate.edu.

 

 

Faculty Corner

Library Grants illustration

Library grants are available for faculty needs

University Libraries offer three grant programs to help Texas State faculty purchase library materials need to support research.

The deadline for the spring 2020 Online Resources Grants is 5 p.m. Friday, February 14. These grants can be used to purchase larger one-time online resources that one department cannot afford through the standard library allocation. A total of $180,000 is available for these grants during the 2019-20 academic year. These funds are often used to purchase primary source databases, journal backfile collections, e-book collections and audio or streaming media collections. Some ideas for use of these funds are found on our One-Time Resources web page. Priority will be given to proposals for resources that enhance the library’s collection and that benefit many departments or greatly benefit one area.

Library research grants helps faculty pay for research and creative activity resources through the acquisition of library materials. Applications for this grant program are due in early November. Eligible materials include things like back issues of journals, electronic resources, DVDs, CDs and microform. Priority is given to materials that can be permanently added to the library collection.

New tenure-track faculty can apply for up to $1,000 in New Faculty Start-Up Grants needed to enhance the library’s collections. These applications are reviewed and funded between September and June. During the 2019-20 academic year, $15,000 was available for funding.

Questions about online resources grants and library research grants should be directed to Head Acquisitions Librarian Ginger Williams at vkw11@txstate.edu. New Faculty Startup Grant questions should be directed to Monographic Acquisitions Librarian Amanda Price at anp125@txstate.edu.

Hathitrust membership makes copyright materials available for those with visual impairment

Do you have a print disability or work with someone who does who needs a resource not available at a Texas State University Library? Check HathiTrust! Texas State’s University Libraries can download full-text of HathiTrust works, even the works that are still in copyright, as an accommodation for a person with a print disability.   Designated library staff can download eligible titles from among the 10 million works that are still in copyright after verifying that the person requesting the work is eligible for an accommodation. If you have a disability, you can have a HathiTrust book downloaded by filling in the HathiTrust Eligibility Verification and Request Form or emailing

Texas State University Dataverse provides avenue to store and share research data

Researching human brain behavior is predictably complex and requires voluminous datasets for analysis. For Dr. Logan Trujillo, assistant professor of psychology, research for a summer 2017 article on the effects of electroencephalogram (EEG) reference choices required not only large datasets, but also a place to publish and share the data. “I study human perception and cognition from basic and applied viewpoints,” Trujillo explained. This research is very data intensive and generates a lot of code for analysis. It’s difficult to share because the research requires tens, if not hundreds, of gigabytes of data.” Not only did Trujillo need a place